How Much Does It Cost To Repair A Hearing Aid? Warranties & Costs

  • 27 Jun 2022 09:55
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How Much Does It Cost To Repair A Hearing Aid? Warranties & Costs

Those wearing or relying on this device will know it is worth the high price.

It enables you to communicate with other people better, hear better even in a noisy environment, and enjoy everything in life.

Like other electronic devices, hearing aids may sometimes stop working, break, or wear out without any evident reason. You’ll expect to pay for some repairs at a point during their lifespan.

How much does it cost to repair a hearing aid? Below is the information you need to know before having your device fixed.

How Much Does It Cost To Repair A Hearing Aid?

During the warranty period, you will be in charge of deductibles only. A standard manufacturer warranty covers missing or broken pieces and a replacement.

After this period, you’ll need to pay for any out-of-pocket service, ranging from $300 (minor fixing) to $600 (major fixing).

Warranties

Check your warranty before repairing. 

Most products offer a two-year warranty at the very beginning, which covers you if any issue occurs with your electronic device during the first two years.

However, this warranty does not cover misuse and mishandling. In most cases, it will cover damage and loss.

That means your service provider will replace the product if it is crushed or lost during the first two years of payment, though you often have to pay a few hundred dollars first as a deductible.

Not every warranty provides this generous coverage. Most only cover mechanical defects, meaning your manufacturer will replace or repair your devices without any fee within 4-10 workdays.

If your warranty duration has expired, the fixing cost will depend on the damage level or the fixing type.

Yet, the bright side is that reparation services also come with their own warranty. So, after you pay for a repair, your device will typically go under another 6-12 months of coverage.

Insurance

Like any other costly electronic device, you can pay for insurance that protects your hearing aids.

The medium of coverage you buy will significantly affect the cost of a fixing service, so it’s worthwhile searching for insurance choices that immediately offer replacements and repairs.

Though you’ll need to have a claim once your product gets damaged or breaks, a good insurance firm will make it easy and nice for customers to seek help.

Out-of-Pocket Costs

The cost depends on the type of repair.

If you’ve run out of your insurance or warranty period and don’t choose to extend it, here are the costs you’ll expect to pay.

Minor Problems

Fortunately, your instrument specialist can help you fix minor problems for little to no cost if your devices exceed their warranty duration.

Minimal replacements and repairs are straightforward to troubleshoot in-office, so drop by a reliable audiologist and ask for his help.

Major Mechanical Problems

Sometimes, your instrument specialist may not handle the reparation in-office since the issues are more severe. For example, your device may need a brand-new electronic component that the audiologist doesn’t have.

If that’s the case, he will send the instrument out for fixing. Most mechanical issues cost around $300-400, yet it’s just an average estimate.

Depending on the damage level, you may receive another one- or two-year warranty for that fixed part.

Re-Casing

Unfortunately, replacing the case or outer shell is one of the costliest services those wearing hearing aids have to pay for.

This service may charge you $500-600. But on the bright side, the new case can come with another one-year coverage.

Irreparable or Old Hearing Aid

One day, when the worst-case comes, your instrument specialist will tell you that they can’t fix your hearing aids, and the only solution is to purchase a brand-new pair.

If so, your device must have got damaged or crushed by water, and the repairs may cost you a painful amount. Another case is that it has been 3-7 years.

So, consult your audiologist’s advice on the best solution for your pocket and current situation.

When To Replace Your Hearing Aid Instead Of Repairing It?

Sometimes, it’s better to buy a brand-new one. 

Suppose the replacements and repairs will take a lot of time, leading the cost to equal a brand-new product, or your devices are too old to function properly.

In that case, your instrument specialist may suggest replacement instead of reparation. It’s also vital to involve your personal preference in the decision.

If you’re content with the quality your current product delivers and can afford the price the repairs charge, you can choose to stay with it.

How Many Years Does a Hearing Aid Last?

An average pair of hearing aids can stay good for 3-7 years. Some can last longer or shorter, depending on the particular style.

For example, in-the-ear models usually last only 4-5 years, whereas behind-the-ear ones can work well within 5-6 years.

Since the in-the-ear products are in more frequent contact with higher temperatures and moisture because of the wearing style, they experience more frequent exposure to earwax and sweat.

Meanwhile, behind-the-ear models can avoid moisture and other everyday-wear problems worn in a position that sits behind your ear.

Conclusion

After reading the information about ‘how much does it cost to repair a hearing aid?’ you know that it’s extremely crucial to care for your instruments carefully and take advantage of any insurance policy and warranty.


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Harlan Ellison By, Harlan Ellison

Harlan Ellison is a writer and audio equipment enthusiast. He's particularly interested in home theater HiFi audio, and he has been the editor of The Audio Critic since its inception. Harlan is known for his sharp wit and scathing critiques, but he also has a great love of music and audio gear. When he's not writing or editing, Harlan can be found listening to music or watching movies with his wife.

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